Elizabeth Jane Corbett

writing her way home

Blog nineteen o Gymru – an eventful Saturday evening

It had been a busy week – Merched y Wawr Bro Dyfi dinner on Monday night, a Merched y Wawr Corris a Chylch dinner on Wedesday night, Cawl a Chan at Dylanwad Wines on Friday night and the two nights in between spent watching Y Gwyll with a friend. I woke up Saturday morning feeling tired and indecisive.

We had two new artists arriving that day. I had to clean the stiwdio and, due to an excess of high fat, high carbohydrate foods, I also needed to go for a run. Added to which, had a party that night and the weather was looking pretty wild. I’d been invited to stay the night. But here’s the thing about me. I am not a late night or a stay overnight person. So when Dan, an American artist staying at Maelor, expressed a desire to see Welsh male voice choir in Abergynolwyn, I broke the I-am-not-a-taxi rule and offered to act as chauffeur.

I checked my maps before we left home. I thought I knew the way to Karen and Crispin’s house. They had a mosaic name plate on their farm gate. I’d be able to see it from the road. Besides, it was a party. They’d have balloons on the gate post, surely?

My first indication that things would go wrong was on the way to Abergynolwyn. The map said six miles. But I had forgotten that driving six miles in Wales is like driving thirty six miles in another country. The roads are so dark and winding. On this particular night, they were also flooded.

‘Gee.’ Dan said. ‘I hadn’t realised it would be this far out of your way.’

Neither had I but it was too late to turn back. We ploughed on through puddle after dark oily puddle until we reached Abergynowlyn. I dropped Dan at the Canolfan with a promise to be back before the pub closed.

I got to the tiny village of Llanfachreth okay and headed out into the back roads. It was darker and narrower than the road to Abergynolwyn. A gusting wind flung rain at my windscreen. Okay, I thought. Maybe there won’t be balloons on the gatepost. But I remembered a stone arch near their house and the striking mosaic. I would come across them eventually.

I didn’t. No matter how slowly, I drove. Nor how high my light beam. I checked my map. My phone didn’t have a signal. I thought I was getting close. But maybe my memory was faulty? Maybe I had to take another turn before I came to the name plate? If only I could find that stone arch. I started driving back along the Llanfachreth Road. But the rain had been falling steadily and part of the Tarmac had dropped away. Before I knew it, my wheels were churning in the mud. Backwards, I went. Then forwards, each time, sinking a little deeper.

I stopped, got out of the car, checked my phone. Still no signal. Added to which, my battery was getting low. I considered walking back to Llanfachreth. But it was ink dark, not a moon or star in sight and I had been raised according to the great, Aussie outback survival motto: “never leave your vehicle.” Besides, I was dressed warmly enough and there were blankets in the car. I wouldn’t freeze, even if I had to stay out all night.

But what about Dan sitting in the choir concert in Abergynolwyn?

The truth is stranger than fiction, they tell me. When writing a novel you can’t make a major plot point turn on coincidence. But as I stood on the windy dark road, trying to work out what to do next, I heard a car engine. A car! Had I imagined it? No, there were lights, not just any lights. I saw a taxi heading towards me. Wow! I thought this is seriously weird. But I stepped onto the road and hailed that cab as if we were in Charring Cross.

‘I’m bogged.’ I said, as if that wasn’t obvious. ‘I’m supposed to be at a party but I got lost.’

‘I’ve just come from a party.’

‘Karen and Crispin’s?’

‘The same.’

‘Oh, wow! Can you take me there?’

It didn’t take long to get to the party. We turned up a side road only a few hundred metres from where I was bogged. The mosaic was there. But there were no balloons on the gatepost. Seriously, what was I thinking? I walked in, apologising for my lateness, and produced what is probably one of the most dreadful Wenglish sentences I have ever uttered.

‘Ces i fy mogio mewn ditch.’

‘Ditch?’

‘Yes. Fy nghar. Bogged. Mewn ditch.’

Once the situation was explained, we made quick decisions. It wasn’t realistic to pull the car out in the dark. Most people had enjoyed a drink or two. I would have to stay the night, even if I wasn’t a house guest kind of person. I logged onto the WIFI and told our American artist he’d have to find his own way home (something I probably should have done from the outset). I then poured myself a glass of wine and enjoyed the party.

***

Oh, in case your wondering, bogio is definitely not the Welsh verb for bogged. But, hey, I mutated correctly and stuck an ‘io’ on the end, which is the golden rule in such cases. Though, someone did later point out that the Welsh word for ditch is ffos. I won’t be forgetting that in a hurry. 🙂

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Blog twenty o Gymru – the winter solstice

4 Comments

  1. Rob

    Typo alert – it’s ffos

    • Elizabeth Jane Corbett

      Oops! Thanks for pointing out. I’ll make the change. 🙂

      • Rob

        Dim probs. It’s from the Latin fossa, meaning, erm, ditch, or possibly from a common ancestor.

  2. What an amazing adventure, Liz. Glad it all turned out well for you. Wishing you a wonderful Christmas and New Year and I’m looking forward to reading more about what is going on there for you.

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